Page 3625 of 3633 Results 36241 - 36250 of 36327
Id/Author/Year/TitleOrder by:  Year  Id  Author  Title
87
Harada H. et Vězda A. (1991): Two New Species of Gyalectoid Lichens from East Asia. - Nat. Hist. Res., 1(2): 13-17

Gyalecta japonica, Gyalideopsis formosana EndNote Read more... 

86
Hale M.E. Jr. (1959): Studies on lichen growth rate and succession. - Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club, 86(2): 126-129

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85
Hale M.E. Jr. (1970): Single-lobe Growth-rate Patterns in the Lichen Parmelia caperata. - Bryologist, 73(1): 72-81

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84
Hale M.E., Jr. (1976): A Monograph of the Lichen Genus Pseudoparmelia Lynge (Parmeliaceae) - Smithsonian Contributions to Botany, 31: 1-62

World monograph of the genus Pseudoparmelia is presented. There are 76 species, most occurring in dry subtemperate to tropical areas and especially concentrated in the arid scrub lands of South Africa, Australia, and Brazil. The genus is characterized 13) an unusually high number of species with divaricatic acid and related orcinol depsides. The following new species are described and combinations are proposed: Pseudoparmelia callichroa Kurok. sp. nov., P. concomitans sp. nov., P. conlabrosa … EndNote Read more... 

83
Hale M.E., Jr. (1975): A Monograph of the Lichen Genus Relicina (Parmeliaceae) - Smithsonian Contributions to Botany, 26: 1-32

revision on the world level is made for Relicina, a generic segregate of Parmelia characterized by having bulbate cilia on the lobe margins and by producing usnic acid in the cortex. Of the 24 species presently known, 19 occur in the Old World tropics, with the greatest concentration in the lowland dipterocarp forests, 3 are endemic to the New World tropics, and 2 occur in both the New and Old World outside of Africa. The most important taxonomic characters are type of rhizine (simple or branched), … EndNote Read more... 

82
Peterson E.B. (1998): Lichens in the Klamath region: What do we know and why have we not found endemics - In: Beigel J.K.,Jules E.S. & Snitkin B. (eds.), Proceedings of the First Conference on Siskiyou Ecology. May 30-June 1, 1997, Kerby and Cave Junction,, p. 120-126, Siskiyou Regional Education Project, Portland

The Klamath region is known for diverse climate, topography, and geology, as well as a very long floristic history. The many endemic vascular plants of the region reflect these unusual qualities. Given the variety of terrestrial and epiphytic habitats, a diverse lichen flora should be expected. Although several rare lichens are known from the region, no endemic lichen taxa have been found. However, the lichen flora of the Klamath region is poorly known; lichens endemic to the region may exist, … EndNote Read more... 

81
Hale M.E. Jr. (1966): Chemistry and Evolution in Lichens. - Israel Journal of Botany, 15: 150-157

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80
Hafellner J. et Poelt J. (1979): Die Arten der Gattung Caloplaca mit pluriloculären sporen (Meroplacis, Triophtalmidium, Xanthocarpia). - Journ. Hattori Bot. Lab., 46: 1-41

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79
Haas R.T. & Clauson A. (1972): Vertical distribution of the lichen genus Physcia on Bigtooth Aspen, Northern Red Oak, and Red Maple at Douglas Lake, Michigan - The Michigan Botanist, 11: 39-42

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78
Greenhalgh G.N. et Whitfield A. (1987): Thallus tip structure and matrix development in Bryoria fuscescens. - Lichenologist, 19(3): 295-305

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