Page 3530 of 3633 Results 35291 - 35300 of 36327
Id/Author/Year/TitleOrder by:  Year  Id  Author  Title
34967
Elvebakk A. (2022): Pannaria microphyllizans (Nyl.) P.M.Jørg. from New Zealand restudied and compared with P. athroophylla (Stirt.) Elvebakk & D.J.Galloway and the three new species Pannaria cassa, P. kantvilasii and P. wrightiorum - Australasian Lichenology, 91: 38-55

Pannaria microphyllizans, a previously misunderstood species, is shown here to have gibbose perispores with long-tailed apical extensions, and to lack TLC-detectable chemistry. It is related to P. athroophylla, a species with different phyllidia, a chemistry of isovicanicin and leprolomin, and spores of the same type but differing in several details. The latter has been too widely interpreted in New Zealand, because there are two more previously undescribed phyllidiate taxa. Pannaria wrightiorum … EndNote PDF Read more... 

34968
Glenny D. & Mosimann J. (2022): Additional lichen records from New Zealand 52. Xanthoparmelia dayiana (Elix & P.M.Armstr.) Elix & J.Johnst. (Parmeliaceae) - Australasian Lichenology, 91: 66-67

Xanthoparmelia dayiana, previously known only from Australia and Réunion Island, is reported from Banks Peninsula, Canterbury, New Zealand. EndNote PDF Read more... 

34969
Gueidan C. & Elix J. (2022): Synonymy in species of Trapelia (lichenized Ascomycota, Trapeliaceae) from Australia - Australasian Lichenology, 91: 22-37

Species of the genus Trapelia are notoriously variable and difficult to identify. Although previous taxonomic studies have taken advantage of molecular data to confirm the placement and delimitation of species, most Australian taxa, including the recently described T. atrocarpa, T. terrestris and T. rosettiformis, have not been the subject of molecular study. Here, ITS sequences were generated for 11 species of Trapelia occurring in Australia and integrated to a dataset of mostly European Trapelia … EndNote PDF Read more... 

34970
McCarthy P. (2022): Gyrographa fecunda (Roccellaceae), a new saxicolous lichen from New South Wales, Australia - Australasian Lichenology, 91: 56-59

Gyrographa fecunda sp. nov. (Roccellaceae) is described from rhyolite in eastern New South Wales. It has a pale to medium greyish brown, minutely areolate thallus containing gyrophoric acid, very small adnate to subsessile ascomata with a lirelliform to contorted-gyrose disc, a blackish lateral excipulum, a dark hypothecium and 3-septate ascospores. EndNote PDF Read more... 

34971
McCarthy P. (2022): Additional lichen records from Australia 89. Acanthothecis consocians (Nyl.) Staiger & Kalb - Australasian Lichenology, 91: 68-72

Acanthothecis consocians (Graphidaceae) is reported for the first time from Australia. Previously known from tree bark elsewhere in the eastern Palaeotropics, the species was collected on the twig of a rainforest tree in Christmas Island, an Australian territory in the north-eastern Indian Ocean. EndNote PDF Read more... 

34972
McCarthy P. (2022): New and interesting species of Opegrapha (Ascomycota, Opegraphaceae) from eastern Australia - Australasian Lichenology, 91: 3-17

Three species of Opegrapha Ach. are described as new. The sympatric O. australis and O. oraria occur on coastal siliceous rocks in eastern Victoria and southern New South Wales, both having thin, pale and inconspicuous thalli, with short, narrow, mostly sessile black lirellae with a basally closed, largely carbonized proper excipulum, a shallow, non-inspersed hymenium and Varia-type asci. However, the former has (3–)5-septate ascospores 12–18 × 2.5–4.5 μm, while those of O. oraria are mostly … EndNote PDF Read more... 

34980
Mallen-Cooper M., Ding J. & Eldridge D.J. (2022): Contrasting effects of vegetation cover and site condition on biocrust communities in subhumid drylands - Journal of Vegetation Science, 33(6): e13161 [13 p.]

Questions: Biocrusts perform critical functional roles in drylands, where they are regulated predominantly by differences in climate and soils. We asked whether biocrust cover and composition differ among sites of varying vegetation cover and condition. Location: Subhumid drylands in the Namoi Region, eastern Australia. Methods: We assessed the effects of different vegetation strata (trees, shrubs, groundcover) and site vegetation condition (index of quality based on vascular plant richness, … URL EndNote Read more... 

34981
Hagenberg L.W.C., Vanneste T., Opedal Ø.H., Petlund H.T., Björkman M.P., Björk R.G., Holien H., Limpens J., Molau U., Graae B.J. & De Frenne P. (2022): Vegetation change on mountaintops in northern Sweden: Stable vascular-plant but reordering of lichen and bryophyte communities - Ecological Research, 37: 722–737

Alpine ecosystems harbor remarkably diverse and distinct plant communities that are characteristically limited to harsh, and cold climatic conditions. As a result of thermal limitation to species occurrence, mountainous ecosystems are considered to be particularly sensitive to climate change. Our understanding of the impact of climate change is mainly based on vascular plants however, whereas cryptogams (i.e., lichens and bryophytes) are generally neglected or simply considered as one functional … URL EndNote Read more... 

34987
Anderson J., Caron F., Beckett P., Spiers G.A., Lévesque N., Charbonneau G.M., Halvorson B., Dufour H. & Lock A. (2022): Distribution of metals and radionuclides in the lichens Cladonia rangiferina and C. mitis from the past uranium mining region of Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada - Heliyon, 8(12): e11863 [11 p.]

The present study was performed in the Elliot Lake area (Ontario, Canada), a site of uranium mining and milling for nearly 40 years between 1950’s and 1990’s. Although mining activities ceased in the mid-1990’s, the site hosts several tailings management areas (TMAs) which are under ongoing rehabilitation and monitoring. Several surveys using lichens as a biomonitoring tool were completed in the 1980s and the 1990s to assess the levels of contaminants. The present survey aimed to re-visit the … URL EndNote Read more... 

35030
Stepanova D., Moisejevs R., Nitcis M. & Mežaka A. (2022): Epiphytic lichens in Latvian manor parks - Acta Biologica Universitatis Daugavpiliensis, 22(2): 125–133

We present the results of lichenological research in 20 Latvian manor parks. In total 62 lichen taxa and one lichenicolous taxa (Muellerella hospitans Stizenb.) were identified on 18 tree taxa. In total, five lichen species were specially protected, eight were Woodland Key Habitat indicator species and two species were red-listed in Latvia. Keywords: biodiversity, urban diversity, lichenized fungi. EndNote Read more... 

Page 3530 of 3633 Results 35291 - 35300 of 36327