Page 3 of 3633 Results 21 - 30 of 36327
Id/Author/Year/TitleOrder by:  Year  Id  Author  Title
34217
Apostolova I., Sopotlieva D., Valcheva M., Ganeva A., Shivarov V., Velev N., Vassilev K.,Terziyska T. & Nekhrizov G. (2022): First survey of the vascular and cryptogam flora on Bulgaria’s ancient mounds - Plants, 11(5): 705 [15 p.]

This work represents the first study of the floristic diversity on Bulgaria’s ancient mounds. The objective of this research was to assess the importance of the mounds for the preservation of the native vascular and cryptogam flora. Our sampling design included 111 ancient mounds distributed throughout the country. We recorded a total of 1059 vascular plants, 58 bryophytes and 61 lichen taxa. Despite their small area, the mounds were shown to preserve nearly a quarter of the Bulgarian flora. The … URL EndNote Read more... 

20760
Ravaud [L.-C.] (1880): Guide du Bryologue et du Lichénologue à Grenoble et dans les environs - Revue Bryologique, 7(6): 106-110

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35226
Doyle E., Blanchon D., Wells S., de Lange P., Lockhart P., Waipara N., Manefield M., Wallis S. & Berry T.-A. (2023): Internal transcribed pacer and 16S amplicon sequencing identifies microbial species associated with asbestos in New Zealand - Genes, 14(3): 729 [12 p.]

Inhalation of asbestos fibres can cause lung inflammation and the later development of asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma, and the use of asbestos is banned in many countries. In most countries, large amounts of asbestos exists within building stock, buried in landfills, and in contaminated soil. Mechanical, thermal, and chemical treatment options do exist, but these are expensive, and they are not effective for contaminated soil, where only small numbers of asbestos fibres may be present … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35141
De Carolis R., Muggia L. & Bacaro G. (2023): Lichen and lichenicolous fungal communities tested as suitable systems for the application of cross-taxon analysis - Diversity, 15: 285 [12 p.]

Lichens are outstanding examples of fungal symbioses that form long-lived structures, the lichen thalli, in which a multiplicity of other microorganisms are hosted. Among these, microfungi seem to establish diverse trophic relationships with their lichen hosts. The most specialised of these fungi are the parasitic lichenicolous fungi, of which the diversity has hardly been explained as a proxy for the diversity of lichen species. Here, we used an exemplar dataset of a well-studied alpine lichen community … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

26497
Sato M. M. (1958): Lichenes japoniae Exsiccati VI (251-300). - Lichen. Misc. , National Science Museum, Tokyo, 11 pp

Anaptychia palmulata v. isidiata, Baeomycea rufus var. carneus, Baeomyces placophyllus, Baeomyces rufus, Bombyliospora japonica, Calicium japonicum, Cetraria cucullata, Cetraria rugosa, Cladonia Krempelhuberi v. subevoluta, Cladonia Krempelhuberi v. subevoluta, Cladonia Krempelhuberi v. sublepidota, Cladonia amaurocraea, Cladonia cornuta f. subdilatata, Cladonia crispata v. infundibulifera f. divulsa, Cladonia deformis f. cyathiformis, Cladonia degenerans f. phyllophora, Cladonia gracilis v. dilatata … EndNote Read more... 

33316
Ohmura Y. (2016): Lichenes Minus Cogniti Exsiccati, Fasc. XXII (Nos. 526–550) - National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo, 4 p

exsiccat; Japan, Taiwan, Norway, Spitzbergen/Svalbard, Antarctica, Peru URL EndNote Read more... 

6410
Magnusson A. H. (1932): Lichens from western North America mainly Washington and Alaska - Ann. Crypt. Exot., 5: 16-38

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2619
Szatala O. (1930): Lichenum cacuminum Tatraensium I - Folia Crypt., 7: 929-932

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21901
Clerc P., Camenzind R., Dietrich M., Groner U., Grundlehner S., Oberli F., Scheidegger C. & Wildi E. (1992): Lobaria amplissima (Scop.) Forss. dans les Prealpes Vaudoises - Meylania, 1: 16-20

Switzerland EndNote Read more... 

31702
Søchting U. & Arup U. (2018): Marchantiana asserigena comb. nov., a possible European immigrant from Australia - Graphis Scripta, 30(6): 115–120

Caloplaca asserigena is known to have a secondary compound different from other species of Teloschistaceae in the Northern Hemisphere. Studies of the secondary chemistry of the Australian Teloschistaceae have revealed the same compound to be present in Marchantiana michelagoensis and Caloplaca marchantiorum. Subsequent molecular studies based on three genes support the affinity of C. asserigena and M. michelagoensis. Accordingly, the species is tentatively included in the genus Marchantiana. Marchantiana … URL EndNote Read more... 

Page 3 of 3633 Results 21 - 30 of 36327