Page 1 of 3650 Results 1 - 10 of 36497
Id/Author/Year/TitleOrder by:  Year  Id  Author  Title
30381
Kernstock [E.] (1897): Dr. J. Steiner, Lichenes Carinthiae exsiccati. (Nr. 251–301.) - Carinthia II, 87: 38–42

Exsiccat URL EndNote Read more... 

30592
Krabbe G. (1883): Morphologie und Entwicklungsgeschichte der Cladoniaceen - Berichte der Deutschen Botanischen Gesellschaft, 1: 64–77

Cladonia; ontogeny EndNote Read more... 

17289
Clerc P. (2008): - Arch. Sci., 61: 73-74

biography EndNote Read more... 

30142
Torrey R.H. (1932): [Field trips of the club:] Bus trip to Fahnestock State Park, April 17 - Torreya, 32: 78–79

Report on excursion EndNote Read more... 

30147
Torrey R.H. (1933): [Field trips of the club:] Lichen excursion at Andover, New Jersey - Torreya, 33: 49–50

Report on excursion EndNote Read more... 

35978
Sandino J., Bollard B., Doshi A., Randall K., Barthelemy J., Robinson S.A. & Gonzalez F. (2023): A green fingerprint of Antarctica: drones, hyperspectral imaging, and machine learning for moss and lichen classification - Remote Sensing, 15(24): 5658 [26 p.]

Mapping Antarctic Specially Protected Areas (ASPAs) remains a critical yet challenging task, especially in extreme environments like Antarctica. Traditional methods are often cumbersome, expensive, and risky, with limited satellite data further hindering accuracy. This study addresses these challenges by developing a workflow that enables precise mapping and monitoring of vegetation in ASPAs. The processing pipeline of this workflow integrates small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)—or drones—to … URL EndNote Read more... 

35643
Lee B.-G. & Hur J.-S. (2023): A new lichenized fungus, Lendemeriella luteoaurantia, with a key to the species of Lendemeriella - Diversity, 15(7): 845 [12 p.]

Lendemeriella luteoaurantia B.G. Lee is described as a new lichen species from South Korea. The new species is identified by smaller, yellow-orange apothecia, larger ascospores with wider septum width, and the absence of Cinereorufa-green pigment and teloschistin, different from the closest species, L. aureopruinosa I.V. Frolov, Vondrák, Arup, Konoreva, S. Chesnokov, Yakovczenko and Davydov in morphology and chemistry. Molecular phylogeny employing internal transcribed spacer (nuITS), nuclear large … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

27381
Zhou Q.-M. & Wei J.-C. (2007): A New Order Umbilicariales J.C. Wei & Q.M. Zhou (Ascomycota) - Mycosystema, 26(1): 40-45

The phylogenetic position of the lichen family Umbilicariaceae is investigated using nucleotide sequences of the nuclear SSU rDNA region. Sequences of 6 species were obtained in this study and aligned to those of other lichenized and non-lichenized fungal species from GenBank. The result indicates that the Umbilicariaceae cannot be included in the order Lecanorales and the order Umbilicariales is supported by both the molecular and morphological data. The new order Umbilicariales within Lecanoromycetes, … EndNote Read more... 

3618
Fryday A. (1996): A provisional re-assessment of the non-yellow species of Rhizocarpon occurring in the British Isles - British Lichen Society Bulletin, 78: 29–40

URL EndNote Read more... 

36458
Zakhozhiy I.G. & Shelyakin M.A. (2024): Accumulation and localization of metals in lichen thallus under conditions of dust pollution during open mining of boxite deposits - Russian Journal of Ecology, 55: 32–41

We studied the accumulation and localization of metals in the foliose lichens Lobaria pulmonaria, Hypogymnia physodes, and Peltigera aphthosa, living in the impact zone of the Sredne-Timansky bauxite mine. A significant accumulation of Al (16–19 g/kg), Fe (16–20 g/kg), and Ti (0.3–0.7 g/kg) by thalli was revealed. From 29 to 82% of the total content of these metals is localized in dust particles weakly attached to the surface of the thalli. The total proportion of intra- and extracellularly … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

Page 1 of 3650 Results 1 - 10 of 36497