Page 3583 of 3650 Results 35821 - 35830 of 36499
Id/Author/Year/TitleOrder by:  Year  Id  Author  Title
35821
Tretiach M. (2023): Pier Luigi Nimis: a life for lichens - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 153-159

There are people who leave their mark in their field. Without doubt, Pier Luigi Nimis (for the registry office, Pierluigi; for friends, Pier; for family members, Pil; for me and a few colleagues, PL) is such a person. On the threshold of retirement but no less active than ever, Pier Luigi is about to begin a new phase of his life, a life dedicated entirely to science and, in particular, to lichenology. URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35822
Zedda L. (2023): The importance of a transformative biodiversity education for perceiving, appreciating and supporting lichen diversity in German urban environments - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 161-168

Urban green spaces are indispensable for the conservation of biodiversity in Germany. In addition, the availability of green areas often provides citizens with the only opportunity to experience nature. Lichens are an important component of urban environments in terms of both species diversity, and ecosystem functions and services. However, they are rarely the subject of biodiversity education. To bolster awareness on their diversity and appreciation, a transformative biodiversity education in both … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35823
Kinge T.R., Jefwa J.M., Houdanon R.D., Kamalebo H.M., Abdel-Azeem A.M., Gryzenhout M., Triebel D., Weibulat T. & Rambold G. (2023): Management and publication of scientific data on traditional mycological and lichenological knowledge in Africa - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 169-179

Africa is an important global reservoir for biological, cultural and traditional knowledge about fungi and lichens, which are used as food, medicine and in mythology, among other things. African human populations are undergoing highly significant changes and adaptation processes, which are accompanied by rapid urbanization, meeting with western civilization, high rural migration and the loss of natural ecosystems. Indigenous knowledge is being lost, including that concerning fungi and lichens. Ethnomycology … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35824
Lücking R., Moncada B. & Dal Forno M. (2023): PhyloKey: a novel method to rapidly and reliably identify species in complex, species-rich genera, and an opportunity for ‘non-molecular museomics’ - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 181-192

We present a novel identification tool called PhyloKey, based on the method of morphology-based, phylogenetic binning developed within the software package RAxML. This method takes a reference data set of species for which both molecular and morphological data are available, computes a molecular reference tree, maps the morphological characters on the tree, and computes weights based on their level of consistency versus homoplasy using maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum parsimony (MP). Additional … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35825
Munzi S., Isocrono D. & Ravera S. (2023): Can we trust iNaturalist in lichenology? Evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of artificial intelligence in lichen identification - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 193-201

iNaturalist is a widely-utilized platform for data collection and sharing among non-professional volunteers and is widely employed in citizen science. This platform's data are also used in scientific studies for a wide range of purposes, including tracking changes in species distribution, monitoring the spread of alien-invasive species, and assessing the impacts of urbanization and land-use change on biodiversity. Lichens, due to their year-round presence on trees, soil and rocks, and their diverse … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35826
Yánez-Ayabaca A., Benítez Á., Molina R.B., Naranjo D., Etayo J., Prieto M., Cevallos G., Caicedo E., Scharnagl K., McNerlin B., Swanson S., Aragón G., Fernández-Prado N., Martínez I., Burgaz A.R., González Y., Déleg J., Vega M., van den Boom P., Magain N., Nugra F., Oña T., Díaz P.J., Villalba-Alemán J., Moncada B., Hernández J., Gilbert E.E. & Bungartz F. (2023): Towards a dynamic checklist of lichen-forming, lichenicolous and allied fungi of Ecuador – using the Consortium of Lichen Herbaria to manage fungal biodiversity in a megadiverse country - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 203-222

A checklist of Lichen-forming, Lichenicolous and Allied Fungi of Ecuador is presented with a total of 2599 species, of which 39 are reported for the first time from the country. The names of three species, Hypotrachyna montufariensis, H. subpartita and Sticta hypoglabra, previously not validly published, are validated. Pertusaria oahuensis, originally introduced by Magnusson as ‘ad interim’, is validated as Lepra oahuensis. The form Leucodermia leucomelos f. albociliata is validated. Two new … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35827
Freire-Rallo S., Diederich P., Millanes A.M. & Wedin M. (2023): Five new species in the Tremella caloplacae complex - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 223-239

Tremella caloplacae (Zahlbr.) Diederich is a species complex including at least nine different species. Here, we formally describe the new species Tremella elegantis, T. nimisiana, T. parietinae, T. pusillae and T. sorediatae. Tremella elegantis induces galls in the hymenium of Rusavskia elegans and forms 2-celled basidia, where cells rarely elongate and sometimes give the appearance of two immature, independent basidia. Tremella nimisiana has small basidiomata (less than 1 mm diam.), narrowly ellipsoid … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35828
Hafellner J. & Grube M. (2023): Arthonia epipolytropa and Arthonia subclemens, two new lichenicolous species on Lecanora polytropa, with a key to the microfungi known on this common species - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 241-251

Arthonia epipolytropa Hafellner & Grube and Arthonia subclemens Hafellner, Grube & Muggia are described as new to science. Both are specific parasites of Lecanora polytropa s. lat., but of differing pathogenicity and of very different appearance. Whereas the clearly parasitic Arthonia epipolytropa with its agglomerated ascomata is presently known with certainty from a number of localities along the arch of the Alps (Austria, Italy, Switzerland), other parts of Europe (Norway, Albania) and northern … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35829
Anantaprayoon N., Hollinger J., Robison A., Kraichak E., Root H. & Leavitt S.D. (2023): Phylogenetic insight into the Lecidea atrobrunnea complex – evidence of narrow geographic endemics and the pressing need for integrative taxonomic revisions - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 253-264

Species of lichen-forming fungi (LFF) display an array of geographical distribution patterns. Among the broadly distributed lichen-forming fungal species, the degree of reproductive isolation and genetic substructure among populations varies widely, in some cases masking unrecognized diversity or meaningful biogeographical patterns. Lecidea atrobrunnea (Raymond ex Lam. & DC.) Schaer. s. lat. (Lecideaceae) is a widespread species complex that has been studied for over two centuries since its initial … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35830
Barcenas-Peña A., Sipman H.J.M., Wirth V., Grewe F. & Lumbsch H.T. (2023): Using morphological, chemical, and molecular data to study the diversity of Xanthoparmelia species from South Africa (Ascomycota, Parmeliaceae) - The Lichenologist, 55(5): 265-273

There is still a high diversity of lichen-forming fungi that remains undescribed, especially cryptic lineages at the species level. Integrating morphological, chemical, and DNA sequence data has proved useful in corroborating species descriptions and delimitations. Here we reviewed morphological features, secondary metabolites and the DNA sequences of ITS, mtSSU and nuLSU markers to study the diversity of Xanthoparmelia in southern Africa. A total of 37 species were recorded. Three of these appear … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

Page 3583 of 3650 Results 35821 - 35830 of 36499