Page 13 of 3649 Results 121 - 130 of 36482
Id/Author/Year/TitleOrder by:  Year  Id  Author  Title
121
John A.E. (1989): Note on the sizes of largest thalli of three species of Rhizocarpon (subgenus Rhizocarpon) at a rockslide in the Canadian Rocky mountains - Arctic and Alpine Research, 21(2): 185-187

The largest thallus sizes of three species of Rhizocarpon (subgenus Rhizocarponi growing at a single site are significantly different. In addition, each species appears to respond differently to local changes in microclimate. Jonas Rockslide, Alberta, Canada, is estimated to be at least 500 yr old, rather than the 100 yr old suggested by other researchers EndNote Read more... 

122
John A.E. (1988): An assesment of the role of biotic interactions and dynamic processes in the organization of species in a saxicolous lichen community - Can. J. Bot., 67: 2025-2037

A saxicolous lichen community is examined for evidence of dynamic processes and biotic interactions among its members. Spatial relationships among species are examined in a series of association analyses at three scales: (i) the "nearestneighbour" scale, i.e., associations between touching thalli; (H) associations between thalli 10 and 20 cm apart; and (Ui) associations at the scale of the whole rock face. The nearest-neighbour analysis reveals fundamental differences in the way crustose and foliose … EndNote Read more... 

123
Kantvilas G. (1990): The genus Roccellinastrum in Tasmania - Lichenologist, 22(1): 79-86

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124
Kärenlampi L. (1970): Distribution of chlorophyll in the lichen Cladonia alpestris - Rep. Kevo Subarctic Res. Stat., 7: 1-8

The chlorophyll conten and growth activity are gl eatest in the top parts of the thallus. A good logarithmic regression was found between the proportion of chlorophyll and the dry weight of the thallus, and a corresponding logarithmic regression was found between the rate of GO:! exchange (per gram dry wt.) and the dry weight. Good linear regressions were found between the net photosynthesis and the dry weight, and between the net photosynthesis and the chlorophyll content. 'Within the size classes … EndNote Read more... 

125
Kärenlampi L. (1970): Morphological analysis of the growth and productivity of the lichen Cladonia alpestris - Rep. Kevo Subarctic Res. Stat., 7: 9-15

Measurements were made of the lengths and diameters of Cladonia alpestris thalli and the lengths of their internodes. The weight distribution in the thallus was studied by dividing thalli and weighing rhe different parts. The relationships between the observed values were studied and conclusions were drawn concerning growth and productivity. There are definite relationships between the length, diameter and weight of the thallus. In the Kevo area the internode seems to continue growing up to the age … EndNote Read more... 

126
Kaucher R. P. & Snider J.A. (1982): The Macrolichen flora of five Adams county nature preserves - Ohio Journal of Science, 82: 302-305

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127
Kiss T. (1982): Aspects and types of competititon between lichen species in epiphytic communities - Acta Botanica Hungarica, 28(1-2): 113-126

The aspects and the types of competition between lichen species in epiphytic communities have been investigated. For this a special terminology was worked out on the types of contacts between foliaceus-foliaceus, Ioliaceus-crustose, foliaceus-fruticose and frut icose-fru ticose species. The results indicate that the competition between colonies is very strong, above all on the small surfaces, in the optimal and terminal phases of succession, It was found that the histological and morphological cons … EndNote Read more... 

128
Klement O. (1965): Zur Kenntnis der Flechtenvegetation der Kanarischen Inseln - Nova Hedwigia, 9: 503-582

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129
Knops J.M.H., Nash III T.H., Boucher V.L. & Schlesinger W.H (1991): Mineral cycling and epiphytic lichens: implications at the ecosystem level - Lichenologist, 23(3): 309-321

The nutrient contribution of lichens as litterfall in forests is discussed for a number of different ecosystems and it is hypothesized that lichens are important in capturing nutrients from wet deposition, occult precipitation, sedimentation, impaction and gaseous uptake. Most nutrients captured by these processes represent new nutrient inputs that would otherwise not be intercepted by the ecosystem. Part of these nutrients will be incorporated into lichen biomass and only become available upon death … EndNote Read more... 

130
Obermayer W. (2003): Lichenotheca Graecensis, Fasc. 12 & 13 (Nos 221-260) - Fritschiana, 43: 1-12

Fascicles 12 & 13 of Lichenotheca Graecensis comprise 40 collections of lichens from the following countries (and administrative subdivisions): Austria (Carinthia; Lower Austria; Salzburg; Styria), Croatia (Rab Island), Germany (Bavaria), Greece (Kos Island), Italia (Trentino-Alto Adige), Portugal (Madeira), Russia (Buryatia; Krasnoyarsk; Tatarstan), Spain (Canary Islands), Uruguay (Florida; Rocha), and United States of America (Alaska). TLC-analyses were carried out for Chrysothrix candelaris, Ch. … EndNote Read more... 

Page 13 of 3649 Results 121 - 130 of 36482