Page 3 of 3664 Results 21 - 30 of 36639
Id/Author/Year/TitleOrder by:  Year  Id  Author  Title
36474
Aadaj J., Tabit A., Algouti A., El Myr A., Elhamdi S.B., Tabet C.B., Lakhlili M., Oudour K., Nidsaid Z. & Laadimi Y. (2023): Mapping of lichen biomarkers of atmospheric pollution in the Agadir urban area - Proceeding Book of 3rd International Conference on Scientific and Academic Research ICSAR 2023, 1(7): 489-493

Air pollution refers to a combination of gases and suspended particles present in the atmosphere, whose concentration levels vary depending on emissions and weather conditions. These substances are harmful to human health and the environment. Analyzing air pollution is a key to assess the level of the pollution in an area. Commonly, the spatial distribution of some plants serves as bio-indictorfor air pollution monitoring. Citing for example, lichens, are autotrophic and symbiotic living organisms … EndNote PDF Read more... 

19283
Aalto-Korte K., Lauerma A. & Alanko K. (2005): Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from lichens in present-day Finland - Contact Dermatitis, 52: 36-38

Lichens are abundant in forests, living on trees, soil, stones and rocks. They contain usnic acid and other lichen acids that are contact allergens. Lichens and liverworts cause woodcutter’s dermatitis, eczema that appears in the forest on the bare skin areas, especially in cold and wet weather. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from lichens occurs in forestry and horticultural workers and in lichen pickers. Lichens can cause immediate allergy, contact urticaria, rhinitis and asthma … EndNote Read more... 

21029
Aamlid D. & Skogheim I. (2001): The occurrence of Hypogymnia physodes and Melanelia olivacea lichens on birch stems in northern boreal forest in uenced by local air pollution - Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift–Norwegian Journal of Geography, 55: 94-98

Epiphytic lichen vegetation on birch stems was studied in the border area between Norway and Russia. The area is heavily in-  uenced by sulphur dioxide pollution emitted from Russian nickel smelters. Hypogymnia physodes and Melanelia olivacea were the two most abundant lichen species on birch stems in the study area. Their coverage was clearly reduced near the pollution sources. Lichen vegetation cover increased with increasing distance from the pollution source from a ‘lichen desert’ to … EndNote Read more... 

13701
Aamlid D., Vassilieva N., Aarrestad P.A., Gytarsky M. L., Lindmo S., Karaban R., Korotkov V., Rindal T., Kuzmicheva V. & Venn K. (2000): The ecological state of the ecosystems in the border areas between Norway and Russia - Boreal Env. Res., 5: 257–278

Six sites for forest ecosystem monitoring were established to perform a long-term study of effects of air pollution on pine forest ecosystems along a pollution gradient in the border areas between Norway and Russia. The main pollution source is a nickel smelter. Several methods and analyses were used to investigate different compartments of this northern boreal forest ecosystem. The differences in ecological condition and diversity observed among the research sites are probably due to the air pollution … EndNote Read more... 

32740
Aanderud Z.T., Bahr J., Robinson D.M., Belnap J., Campbell T.P., Gill R.A., McMillian B. & St. Clair S. (2019): The burning of biocrusts facilitates the emergence of a bare soil community of poorly-connected chemoheterotrophic Bacteria with depressed ecosystem services - Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7: 467 [14 p.]

Wildfires destabilize biocrust, requiring decades for most biological constituents to regenerate, but bacteria may recover quickly and mitigate the detrimental consequences of burnt soils. To evaluate the short-term recovery of biocrust bacteria, we tracked shifts in bacterial community form and function in Cyanobacteria/lichen-dominated (shrub interspaces) and Cyanobacteria/moss-dominated (beneath Artemisia tridentata) biocrusts 1 week, 2 months, and 1 year following a large-scale burn manipulations … URL EndNote Read more... 

32544
Aartsma P., Asplund J., Odland A., Reinhardt S. & Renssen H. (2020): Surface albedo of alpine lichen heaths and shrub vegetation - Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 52(1): 312–322

Lichen heaths are declining in abundance while shrubs are increasing their range in alpine and arctic areas due to climate change. This can have a large impact on the surface albedo of these areas. The aim of this article is to quantify the difference in albedo between lichen heaths and shrub-dominated vegetation and the variability within lichen heaths. Several environmental conditions that can influence the albedo measurements are considered. We measured the albedo of twenty lichen- and shrub-dominated … URL EndNote Read more... 

36451
Aartsma P., Asplund J., Odland A., Reinhardt S. & Renssen H. (2020): The decline of alpine lichen heaths generates atmospheric heating but subsurface cooling during the growing season - Biogeosciences, 2024: 1-31

Lichen heaths are declining in abundance in alpine and arctic areas partly due to an increasing competition with shrubs. This shift in vegetation types might have important consequences for the microclimate and climate on a larger scale. The aim of our study is to measure the difference in microclimatic conditions between lichen heaths and shrub vegetation during the growing season. With a paired plot design, we measured the net radiation, soil heat flux, soil temperature, and soil moisture on an … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

35779
Aartsma P., Odland A., Reinhardt S. & Renssen H. (2023): Drivers of soil temperature variation in alpine lichen heaths and shrub vegetation during the summer - Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 55(1): 2209397 [13 p.]

Lichen heaths are decreasing in abundance in alpine and Arctic areas because of an increased competition with shrubs. This shift in vegetation might have important consequences for the soil temperature. The aim of this study is to find the drivers of the variation in soil temperature below lichen heaths and shrubs. Moreover, we want to gain more insight in the variability of the soil temperature below lichen heaths. We measured the soil temperature in thirty lichen plots and fifteen shrub plots … URL EndNote PDF Read more... 

27640
Ababaikeli G., Abbas A., Guo S.-Y., Tumier A. & Mamuti R. (2016): Diploschistes tianshanensis sp. nov., a corticolous species from Northwestern China - Mycotaxon, 131(3): 565–574

Diploschistes tianshanensis is described as a new species, found on rotten wood with mosses and other lichens (Cladonia sp.) in an arid region of Northwestern China. The new fungus, which is diagnosed by urceolate ascomata and large ascospores, resembles D. gypsaceus but is readily distinguished by its epruinose thallus surface. ITS rDNA sequence analyses support the taxon as a distinct species. The description of D. tianshanensis is accompanied by notes on its chemistry, distribution and ecology, … EndNote Read more... 

29172
Ababaikeli G., Abdulla A., Abbas A., Guo S.-Y. & Tumur A. (2018): Diploschistes wui sp. nov., an overlooked saxicolous lichen from Northwestern China - Mycotaxon, 133(1): 141–148

Diploschistes wui is described as a new species, based on three collections from Xinjiang in Northwestern China. It is characterized by a bluish gray and thin thallus, epruinose discs, small, 8-spored asci, and small ascospores. The new lichen resembles D. rampoddensis but is readily distinguished by the absence of surface crystals and pruinose discs. It grows on rocks at elevations above 1800 m. Our ITS rDNA sequence analyses support this species as independent. Key words—biodiversity, central … EndNote Read more... 

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